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Sunday, July 27, 2014

Former Jet Fighter Pilot Recalls UFO Encounters


Credit: openminds.tv

Former Yugoslavian Army Jet Fighter Pilot Recalls UFO Encounters

Suad Hamzić has been sharing his memoirs as a former Yugoslavian Army jet fighter on Tango Six, a website that reports on the Serbian Air Force. In his latest installment he writes about his belief in UFOs, and he shares the personal encounters that have convinced him of their existence.

Hamzić has a unique background. Before becoming a jet fighter Hamzić attended the Yugoslavian Air Force Academy and the RAF staff college in Great Britain. In 1980, he came to the United States where he worked evaluating the F-5 fighter jet. From 1986 to 1990 he served as a military attaché of the armed forces of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in Turkey. He then retired as a colonel in 1993.

Hamzić starts of his latest memoir entry by commenting on how unpopular the UFO topic can be, and how reluctant people can be to write about it. He says that the approach by authorities is to be "generally restrained, incomplete, vague and mysterious, which further complicates any rational debate on UFOs." 


Saturday, July 19, 2014

Alien life exoplanets


The alien planet Kepler 186f is the first extrasolar world ever found to be about the size of Earth and in the habitable zone of its parent star. But if scientists ever hope to try to find life on such a planet, giant new space telescopes are needed.
NASA AMES/SETI INSTITUTE/JPL-CALTECH


Humanity will probably have to wait a few decades to find out if life is common beyond our own solar system.

Dr. Ian O'Neill, space producer for Discovery News, steps in to discuss some of the ways scientists are working to detect signs of life on other worlds.
While NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) — which is scheduled to launch in 2018 — will be capable of finding signs of life on nearby exoplanets, a broad and bona fide hunt for life beyond Earth's neighborhood will require bigger spacecraft that aren't even on the agency's books yet, experts say. Read more >>